Wednesday

The $40 lawyer

Heaven help us. The St. Petersburg Times Floridian has decided to run a lengthy series on a year in the life of a PD. So who should they pick? Could it be a brilliant highly skilled, graduate of a top law school (the sort of lawyers we usually hire at The Bronx Defenders)? Of course not.

This being Florida, and these being public defenders, even the most well meaning members of the fourth estate can't escape their pathetic reliance on stereotypes. As a consequence, I bring you Charley...described in the pull quote as follows:

"After passing the Bar exam on his fourth try, Charley Demosthenous wasn't exactly a hot property. Even his father thought he should go sell screwdrivers. Representing the poor and miserable was his last chance to be somebody."


Stereotypical PD Failure Charley

It's shit like this that makes me happy I've written a book of my own. I'll be relieved when somewhere in the world there is a piece of PD literature that doesn't assume we all failed the bar, or wanted to be prosecutors.

More on this appalling series as it progresses....

4 comments:

Logan said...

I agree. I'll be going to Univ of Florida law school in the fall of 2006, and I take offense that they depict Florida's worst lawyer as the typical public defender. I've wanted to be a public defender for some time...and this is kind of disheartening to be honest.

topsixrows said...

I think you guys got it wrong. Academic success has very little to do with being a good trial lawyer.

No judge or jury requires to see your transcript, nor do they care what law school you attended. They don't care how many books you wrote. When the other side is cutting your client's settlement check none of it matters.

The guy has obviously become a proficient attorney. Maybe that says more about the law school he attended than failing the bar does?

Anonymous said...

Academic success in law school determines where you will be employed initially.

I left the profession, but I know absolutely brilliant people in my class who got horrible grades and could not find any work upon graduation. At the same time, there were people who I thought would suck something awful as lawyers who were great exam takers and who got great jobs.

From how I understand it, the firms look at your grades because most people have the more or less the same resume, and this is a really easy way to pick who you want.

Anonymous said...

Academic success in law school determines where you will be employed initially.

I left the profession, but I know absolutely brilliant people in my class who got horrible grades and could not find any work upon graduation. At the same time, there were people who I thought would suck something awful as lawyers who were great exam takers and who got great jobs.

From how I understand it, the firms look at your grades because most people have the more or less the same resume, and this is a really easy way to pick who you want.